Barcade Project

There is text between pictures.

This post is just to document some progress on the new arcade system I’m building.  This way I won’t lose the pictures I’ve taken.  🙂

So, I started by ordering a kit of CNC cut MDF, which is a short cut for those of us with little patience.  It basically just arrives as a box of wood:

Box of Wood

Using a kreg jig,  self-tapping screws, wood glue, etc, I started to have something resembling a bartop arcade box:

Stack of wood
Using jig to cut recessed screw holes

Beauty looking to play some Frogger.

Next deal was to take an old 19″ LCD monitor, and remove the panel from the plastic housing.  I took out all the screws I could find, but ended up busting the case into pieces anyway.  Doesn’t matter, this thing will never be a computer monitor again.  Used some pieces of 1×2 to build up a support on the back, then attached the monitor to the MDF piece which fits in the cabinet:

Stacking wood on top of panel screw hole
Two mounting points ready
Monitor attached to MDF backer board
Monitor temporarily in place to see if it fits.

At this point it was time to finally start building the control panel.  I bought two Sanwa joysticks from Japan, and a bunch of Happ arcade buttons.  These are the same hardware they use to make Ms Pacman and Galaga.

My trusty soldering iron
One wire soldered, many to go.

Inserted one joystick and one button into control panel:  (Monica was kind enough to paint the control panel black for me.  If I had done it there would be runs and strange lines and smudges.)

Under control panel is ugly.

Installed the other joystick, and all the buttons.  Pictures show completed setup, then hardware underneath, then everything wired together into a USB controller.  God help me if any of that doesn’t work right.

It’s so pretty…
Buttons with micro-switches attached.
Wires, wires, wires. Wires.

This is as far as I’ve gotten.  My next step is to drill a couple of holes in the cabinet for two additional buttons that I want.  Also need to get some speakers installed, glass front, possibly lighted marque on top.

Solaris 11 Port Redirect

Just documenting this for my own sanity in case I need to find it again later.  The steps might also be the same on Solaris 10 but I haven’t tested them on older version.

Usage:  You want to do a very simple port redirect for whatever reason.

From the global zone:

svcadm disable svc:/network/ipfilter:default

Edit file /etc/ipf/ipnat.conf

Add line like this:

rdr ipmp0 10.97.26.140 port 3600 -> 10.97.26.140 port 3601 tcp

where:  ipmp0 is the nic on which the ip address lives.  (Use the main nic name, not ipmp0:2 or whatever the zone uses)  10.97.26.140 is the ip address we want to modify.  3600 is the port we want to change.  3601 is the port we want to redirect to.

Now enable filter:

svcadm enable svc:/network/ipfilter:default

Indian Butter Chicken, Jilly-Style

Fry up some chicken thighs in butter, set aside.

Dice up a few onions, and fry them in the butter.

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Add a bunch of garam masala, cumin, cayenne pepper to the onions, and maybe a little olive oil.

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Shred the chicken, throw it in there with a can of diced tomatoes, a can of peas, and a can of tomato sauce.

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After you let the chicken mixture cook for a bit, add a pint of heavy whipping cream and some red food coloring.  Then eat it.  Over rice.

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